Adobe shows the raw, dark side of Photoshop CS6

Photoshop CS6 will get a dark gray interface by default and, of course it inherits Lightroom 4's new raw-image editing controls.

Photoshop CS6 will get a new dark look, but it's not required. This view also shows the visual and numeric information about brush settings.
Photoshop CS6 will get a new dark look, but it's not required. This view also shows the visual and numeric information about brush settings. (Click to enlarge.) screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Adobe Systems has published a glimpse of the forthcoming Photoshop CS6, an update that brings the dark workspace and raw-image editing tools from the new beta of its sister program, Lightroom 4 .

Bryan O'Neil Hughes, an Adobe senior product manager, showed off a bit of the new software in a YouTube video published yesterday. Photoshop CS6 is set to debut along with the sixth version of Adobe's Creative Suite in the first half of 2012.

Darker photo backgrounds are all the rage for photo software since they make photos stand out nicely; the darker interface used in Lightroom and the consumer-oriented Photoshop Elements is matched by Phase One Capture One, DxO Optics Pro, and others. But Photoshop users can be a conservative bunch, so I wouldn't be surprised to hear some squawking. Fortunately, the interface can be changed to lighter tones for those who are change-averse or who fear their tonal judgements will be skewed by the noir look.

"We have a darker interface that allows for a more immersive experience," O'Neil Hughes said. "We're able to focus on the image and not on the interface itself."

The video is titled "Sneak Peek #1," so I'm guessing we'll see more as we approach the final release.

O'Neil Hughes also showed off the new Camera Raw module, used to edit the raw photos that higher-end cameras can take--or for that matter to edit JPEGs or other more ordinary formats. To nobody's surprise, the new Camera Raw module gets the same editing controls as the Lightroom 4 beta, whose raw-processing engine it shares.

Adobe's Photoshop CS6 gets the raw-image editing controls visible already in Lightroom 4.
Adobe's Photoshop CS6 gets the raw-image editing controls visible already in Lightroom 4. (Click to enlarge.) screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

That means that there's a big change for tasks like pulling back overexposed highlights or filling in darker shadows. It also means a lot more can be done with adjustment brushes--the aforementioned shadow and highlight adjustments, for example, or selective sharpening, noise reduction, white balance tweaks.

O'Neil Hughes also showed a minor change to the visual settings of the brush characteristics. The onscreen preview visually shows how much the brush edge feathers and is accompanied by textual information about the brush size and edge hardness.

Via Terry White

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

In the market for a new TV?

We've done the research for you. Check out our list of the best TVs of 2014 (so far!)